The Best and Worst States for Protection Against Elder Abuse

The older the population gets, the greater the potential for elder abuse. States have laws in place designed to combat elder abuse, but some states are doing a better job than others. The consumer finance website WalletHub researched the protections in place in all 50 states and the District of Columbia to determine which states have the best protections against elder abuse.

The prevalence of elder abuse is hard to calculate because the crime is underreported, but according to the National Council on Aging, approximately 1 in 10 Americans age 60 or older have experienced some form of elder abuse. In 2011, a MetLife study estimated that older Americans are losing $2.9 billion annually to elder financial abuse.

To determine its rankings, WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across three key areas:
•    Prevalence of elder abuse in the state
•    Resources spent on preventing elder abuse and offering legal assistance
•    Protection against elder abuse through laws, the availability of eldercare organizations and services, the quality of nursing homes and assisted living facilities, and other factors

The survey found that Massachusetts, Wisconsin, and Nevada had the best protections overall while New Jersey, Wyoming, and South Carolina had the worst. Massachusetts, Wisconsin, and Nevada, along with Rhode Island and Arizona, all ranked high in total expenditures on elder abuse prevention. However, the states with the lowest rates of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation complaints were Louisiana, New York, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Michigan.

WalletHub consulted with a panel of experts in social work, psychology, law, and gerontology on how to best protect seniors from abuse. Recommendations included incentivizing banks to report suspicious activity, requiring credit checks and background checks on caregivers, and providing more support to seniors to help them remain independent and be on the lookout for people trying to harm them.

To see how your state compares in the WalletHub survey, click here.

Can You Put a Surveillance Camera in a Nursing Home Room?

Technological advances have made it easier to stay connected with loved ones all the time. This has included the ability to install cameras in a loved one’s nursing home room. These so-called “granny cams” have legal and privacy implications.

The benefit of putting a surveillance camera in a nursing home is the ability to monitor your family member’s care. Families that suspect abuse or neglect can keep on eye caregivers. Being able to observe care from afar can give family members peace of mind that their loved one is being well taken care of. It can also serve as evidence if abuse is found. Even if there is no abuse, cameras can be helpful to observe if caregivers are using improper techniques that may injure a resident.

On the other hand, cameras raise privacy concerns for both residents (including roommates) and caregivers. Residents may not want to be monitored while they are in a vulnerable state, such as changing or bathing. If the recording device picks up audio, then even the resident’s conversations may no longer be private.

All this aside, do nursing homes have to permit families to install cameras? This varies depending on the facility. Some nursing homes may have language in their admission contracts banning cameras or imposing specific requirements for their use. However, concerns over elder abuse have led some states to pass laws allowing cameras in nursing homes. At least six states — Illinois, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Washington — have passed laws permitting families to install a camera in a nursing home if the resident and the resident’s roommate have agreed. Utah permits cameras in assisted living facilities. New Jersey does not have a law specifically permitting cameras, but it has a program that loans surveillance cameras to families who suspect abuse. In other states, the law surrounding camera use is more vague.

If you are considering installing a camera in a loved one’s nursing home room, you should contact your attorney to discuss the legal and practical implications.

For a fact sheet about nursing home surveillance from The National Consumer Voice for Quality Long-Term Care, click here. And keep in mind the Consumer Voice’s advice that cameras are “no substitute for personal involvement and monitoring.”

Long-Term Care Insurer Cannot Be Sued for Elder Financial Abuse

Long-term care insurance policyholders suing Bankers Life and Casualty Company were dealt a blow by the Oregon Supreme Court when it ruled that the state’s elder financial abuse statute does not apply to their case.

Residents of Oregon who bought long-term care insurance policies from Bankers Life and Casualty Company sued the insurer five years ago in federal court. The policyholders claimed that the company violated Oregon’s elder financial abuse law by purposely delaying and denying insurance claims. The policyholders alleged that, among other things, the company didn’t answer phone calls, lost documents, wrongly denied claims, and paid less than policyholders were entitled to.

The lead plaintiff, 87-year-old Lorraine Bates, moved into an adult foster home in 2009 but Bankers refused to pay her claim, saying the facility didn’t meet its policy requirements. Another plaintiff, Eileen Burk, purchased a long-term health-care policy from Bankers.  After she moved into an assisted living facility, her son had trouble filing a claim with the insurance company because the company refused to assist him. Continue reading

Fear of Losing Home to Medicaid Contributed to Elder Abuse Case

A daughter and granddaughter’s fear of losing their home to Medicaid may have contributed to a severe case of elder abuse. If the pair had consulted with an elder law attorney, they might have figured out a way to get their mother the care she needed and also protect their house.

Amanda Havens was sentenced to 17 years in prison for elder abuse after her grandmother, Dorothy Havens, was found neglected, with bedsores and open wounds, in the home they shared.  The grandmother died the day after being discovered by authorities.  Amanda’s mother, Kathryn Havens, who also lived with Dorothy, is awaiting trial for second-degree murder. According to an article in the Record Searchlight, a local publication, Amanda and Kathryn knew Dorothy needed full-time care, but they did not apply for Medicaid on her behalf due to a fear that Medicaid would “take” the house.

It is a common misconception that the state will immediately take a Medicaid recipient’s home. Nursing home residents do not automatically have to sell their homes in order to qualify for Medicaid. In some states, the home will not be considered a countable asset for Medicaid eligibility purposes as long as the nursing home resident intends to return home; in other states, the nursing home resident must prove a likelihood of returning home. The state may place a lien on the home, which means that if the home is sold, the Medicaid recipient would have to pay back the state for the amount of the lien. Continue reading